Annie Dunne

Annie Dunne
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Product Description

It is 1959 in Wicklow, Ireland, and Annie and her cousin Sarah are living and working together to keep Sarah's small farm running. Suddenly, Annie's young niece and nephew are left in their care.



Unprepared for the chaos that the two children inevitably bring, but nervously excited nonetheless, Annie finds the interruption of her normal life and her last chance at happiness complicated further by the attention being paid to Sarah by a local man with his eye on the farm.

 

A summer of adventure, pain, delight, and, ultimately, epiphany unfolds for both the children and their caretakers in this poignant and exquisitely told story of innocence, loss, and reconciliation.



Amazon.com Review

The central character in Sebastian Barry's novel Annie Dunne is a woman who has been pushed to the margins, a woman whom life has given few chances of happiness and fulfillment. Unmarried, she spends years as housekeeper for her brother-in-law because her sister is too ill to manage. Her sister dies, her brother-in-law remarries, and Annie Dunne is homeless. Invited by her cousin Sarah, she moves to a small farm in a remote part of Wicklow. As the novel opens, the two cousins share their lives and the work on the farm. It is the late 1950s and rural Ireland is changing around them. Annie's nephew heads for London in search of work and leaves his young children with their great-aunt. Content with her life with Sarah, Annie also finds a new capacity for love in her feelings for the two children. Yet even the small pleasures that Annie finds in her life are threatened. An unlikely suitor pays court to Sarah, and Annie's love for the children opens her up to pain almost as much as to happiness. Annie Dunne is a novel in which few external dramas occur--there is an accident with a pony and trap, one of the children goes temporarily missing--but Barry evokes superbly the inner dramas of his characters. In a society where emotions are often severely repressed and expressed only obliquely, small incidents hint at larger feelings and Barry has written a story in which these are subtly and poignantly unfolded. --Nick Rennison, Amazon.co.uk

Product Description

It is 1959 in Wicklow, Ireland, and Annie and her cousin Sarah are living and working together to keep Sarah's small farm running. Suddenly, Annie's young niece and nephew are left in their care.



Unprepared for the chaos that the two children inevitably bring, but nervously excited nonetheless, Annie finds the interruption of her normal life and her last chance at happiness complicated further by the attention being paid to Sarah by a local man with his eye on the farm.

 

A summer of adventure, pain, delight, and, ultimately, epiphany unfolds for both the children and their caretakers in this poignant and exquisitely told story of innocence, loss, and reconciliation.



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beautiful prose I felt that I was there experimenting her ..., July 6, 2014
beautiful prose I felt that I was there experimenting her problems with her and seeing the lovely countryside that inspired her

Just brilliant, July 3, 2014
No author I know can write like Sebastian Barry, every one of his books a triumph of English literature. You may not like the characters or what they do but you will never be disappointed by how the stories are written. The narrator, here, Annie is remarkably self effacing yet, well meaning though she may think she is, is actually astonishingly unattractive as a person, particularly towards the one person she should not be, Sarah. Rural life in 50's Ireland was harsh and cruel for those whose peasant livelihoods meant that there was little to their world beyond the broken walls of their small farms. Sebastian Barry takes you there, giving the reader a moving and raw insight into their intense lives, which is so easily unbalanced with the arrival of others in this instance, two children and Billy. Just brilliant

Not bad but not terrific, May 31, 2014
While this book wasn't bad, I can't say I thought it was terrific. For some reason I just couldn't get into it. Not sure why.

You will fall in love with this book, May 11, 2014
Annie Dunne is simple but big-hearted. This is an extremely difficult and beautiful book. The subtext of the events put you right in the time and place, and it is a precarious situation. However, Annie is someone hard to defeat.

Powerful story telling of lost lives and places, April 14, 2014
Sebastian Barry has such a fine eye and keen ear, that you engage with his writing as you would a piece of music, totally wrapped up and transported elsewhere before you know it. "Annie Dunne" is not an easy read. It is both captivating and disturbing. Annie herself has had a hard life and is quick to express her bitterness in ways which affect the reader almost as much as the characters she targets for her sharp remarks. Barry beautifully captures the shifting rhythms and seasons of farm life in a poor Irish rural district in the 1950s. He also weaves together a tale across the generations, living and dead, that is both heart-breaking in its harshness and uplifting in its moments of joy and hearty humour, of which there are many. So it must have been for generations who worked the land for very little reward.

Rural Ireland, February 27, 2014
Beautifully written as always. Story could be better, evocative of a isolated and rural Ireland that no longer exists - thankfully

Poetry, January 29, 2014
One of my all-time favorites. The writing is brilliant. It's pure poetry, though maybe you need an Irish background to truly appreciate it.

style of writig, January 27, 2014
I really enjoyed Barry's use of language and style of writing, it verges on poetry. I ordered this book after reading 'Its a Long Long Way'

Sebastian Barry is a good writer, April 5, 2013
I generally like this author's novels and this one is a good read.
I would recommend this book to others.

Gorgeous writing, March 19, 2013
A few years ago I read "The Secret Scripture" by this author, and it was so good that I wanted to read anything else he'd written; with "Annie Dunne" I finally got back to his work and it was worth the wait. Annie is a great character - through her first-person narrative, we become aware not only of her strength and compassion, but also of flaws and limitations that she doesn't clearly perceive, and I think it takes a really good writer to pull that off. I was disappointed in a major, jarring plot device the author used, though, and never quite reconciled myself to it, but otherwise found the story quite beautiful and poignant. What really makes this a standout, though, is the absolutely remarkable, lyrical writing - I sheepishly admit to often skimming when I read, but you simply can't read this story quickly because its language, imagery, and rhythm are so wonderful.